Letters

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December
15 Minutes of Fame
Hi Chuck and Sandra,

What a surprise to find TWO pieces in latest "new" on Duckworks. The pincushion shot of "Metallic Voodoo" In December Reports and piece on Two Origami's I built. Am sending links to my grown kids and friends.

Glassing/taping of MV's bottom tomorrow weather allowing. I'll be needing oars soon.

Thanks so much for Duckworks in all of its forms. I couldn't build boats w/o it and you both.
--
Steve Chambers

Podcast
Chuck,

I just listened to your PodCast. It was GREAT!!!!! I learned a lot. I got all enthused about the Texas 200 (again).

Glenn Tips is a big fan of furledsails.com. He tipped me off to the pod cast.

Tim

Chuck,

The furled sails podcast was great!

TJH

Help for Rich

This may help Rich F., 'Texas Taxes', Nov. Letters.

He reported Texas wants to see his receipts for boat building materials before they will register his boat; receipts he doesn't have.

Michigan has a similar requirement. They also have a loophole. There is a provision for boats built with 'materials on hand'. Someone realized that very small boats can be built with recovered, old, or otherwise undocumented materials.

If Texas has the same provosion, perhaps Rich can still get his boat registered.

Vince F.

Wanderer Update

Hi Chuck,

As you may have gathered, shaking things down took a bit.

There was a heavy lee helm at first; pulling the jib back a foot helped a lot with that but didn't entirely eliminate it. I didn't adequately account for the effect of those twin 2" keelsons. Then the board stuck .. a lot, and finally totally. The clearance was tight and it swelled a bit. So ... I cut it out and built a daggerboard .. roughly 2' x 3&1/2 ', same area. Doing so moved the center of resistance forward 6". Voila! a bit of weather helm .. light in light air, a bit more with a breeze ... just right. And the board now lays perfectly between the two cabin seats, making a perfect 6&1/2' long double bunk.

And now she sails beautifully! After the first few sails at Lake Galena, the past three outing I've gone up to Nockamixon which is much larger and has a lot of sailing. It's just a ball! I was asked "is it a WW Potter 15?" 'Nope - my own design.' And I've sailed with a Potter 15 and they seem to be awfully close .. I'm either a smidgen quicker or the same. And wonderfully easy to sail, exceptionally steady (I often stand as I sail; not an issue till it's over 10 knots. Goes well to the wind; reaches steadily, and runs quietly along. If there is more than 1 knot I'm sliding along.

There has been some learning on how to best run the lines and trim the sails to go along with the jib and board modifications, but two weeks ago I had her out in light air and had a beautiful Autumn afternoon. This past Thursday it was a Grey sky and 5 to 10, with stretches and gusts to 15 or more .. nothing to it! I don't think it's yet heeled more than 12 degrees or so. And It's totally dry, of course.

Steve Bosquette has been a big help in thinking things through. (Wait till you see the 28' Elco-like he's building out of the Sneakeasy hull!)

Here's the report of today's outing I just sent him:

'Went out again this afternoon and had another good sail. Launched up at the Marina and got asked "is it a Bolger?" I think that's a compliment (friendly fellow anyhow); out on the lake got other kudos & some guy took a lot of pictures. It's certainly the most distinctive boat on the lake what being a yawl, one of a kind, and home built. But best of all, it really sails well.

With the balance just right, I can go where I want to. The air was 2 - 8, the occasional short stretches of maybe 12 ... she's handles so easily .. seems like dead even with a Potter 15 and close to the Compac 16; slower than the Catalina 22 & some others ... some of them a keel boats. There was a Lightening and boy does that go ... to the wind, off the wind .. just leaves everything else behind.

It was tricky getting in though, as the wind bounced around more than 180 near the ramp .. wish I had had an outboard. The sails were loose but I pulled the board a bit early and keelson or not, with that freeboard the little electric just barely gave me enough to maintain steerage.'

Now I'm elated, or something like it. And smile Chuck .. it wouldn't be possible without all the help from the Duckworks crew. A full report with pictures is coming, but I'll be sailing till at least Thanksgiving.

Bob Throne

Can't Find a Design
Dear Chuck,

You have developed a really great web-site.

I have browsed through it on numerous occasions. There was a lovely photo in your archives of a raised-deck cruiser in forest green, (with no pilot -house) which I would often notice. Now that I'm looking for building plans I can't locate it anymore. It was around 20' & I've searched via Duckwork's engine without luck. Similar boats that come to mind are: Tom Lathrop's Bluejacket, Karl Stambaugh's Ragtime. It could even have been a modified Skiff America?

If you can remember this particular boat or perhaps stare me in the right direction for a suitable seaworthy design, I would be most appreciative.

Thanks very much for your time,

Laurence

Thanks

Hi Chuck,

This is just to thank you for drawing my attention via your December Webwatch to Peter Spectre's Compass Rose Review. For years I used to buy Wooden Boat just to read his `On the waterfront' columns (in which he invariably slipped in a few photos of mine from Windling World, motivated me to make contact with Bob Hicks who still carries my article in MAIB and became a good friend. When PS left WB it was like losing a vital link with someone I admired greatly but had never met, now thanks to you, I am enjoying his above-mentioned columns and delving through his archives. That is all I wanted to say other than conveying kindest regards.

Mark Steele

November
Lightweight Construction
Hi Chuck

Another material you might find interesting is mahogany plywood sold in lumber stores as 1/8" door skins. These have a low weight/ stiffness ratio. They are nature's composite, with very little glue used by the manufacturers and hence the low weight. For the chines and gunwales I use 3/4" x 3/4" doug. fir (DF) cut from 2 x 4s on a table saw. Joints are made by wood glue and 3/4" nails (much nicer to handle than resins). Use copper ring nails if you can find them.

To make your pirogue, cut out the bottom from sheets of door skin.
For a 16" boat use an 8' center length and 4' lengths at each end.
Use inside scabbed joints. Bend to the required curvature which is easily done by hand, and clamp to maintain curvature. Glue and nail
(G&N) a DF strip on each edge. Instead of hammering nails, try driving them with a pair of hand pliers. Sand to give the edge the required angle for the sides. Only very gentle double-curvature is possible with a 1/8 ply sheet. Cut rectangular sheets for the sides and G&N to chines. The outside ply should be upright. Clamp in place and get the desired shape on one side and copy the shape on to the the other side. Use DF shaped posts for bow and stern joints (out of
1 x 1 or 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 sections). G&N 3/4 x 3/4 DF strips for gunwales. Use a saber saw and sandpaper to trim sides to chines and gunwales. Install seats using 1/8 ply reinforced by G&N DF strips if necessary. Use 3/4 DF strips G&N to side and bottom for joints of
seats. Plug any errant holes with chopped glass and resin.
Construction time very short: dictated by wood glue drying time.

To finish use "boat paint". To make boat paint I buy gallons of latex paint cheaply from OSH, a hardware store, where paint has been returned because of wrong color and re-sold very cheaply. I mix these together in a bucket and finish up with interesting colors, but does color really matter? I apply three or four coats, tipping the boat upside down and on its sides to ensure that the paint soaks down into the wood.

The result: a cheap, very easy-to-build, lightweight piroque/kyak/ canoe. Use of a manufactured laminate saves the lay-up process.

Plans? Shape the bottom to the desired size. Decide on the
freeboard needed (remember Archimedes) and start cutting wood.
Remember, the two sides should be the same shape.

If you build, please let me know what you think.

Peter O'Driscoll

Searching for Sir Francis Chichester
Hi There

I wish to obtain copies and photos of articles/maps etc regarding Sir Francis Chichester from the past for an exhibition display that will be hosted in Australia.

Any documents, stamps, books or photos will be presented with your name & contact details that would only increase your identity.

Would you or anyone you know like to make a contribution to the exhibition whether it be by way of personal comments about Sir Francis or photos of his yacht/plane of this great man.

Any help from your readers will be appreciated.

Thanking you in advance.

Cheers
Melinda Mooney (bree_melinda@hotmail.com - Australia
PDRacers in good Company
Hi Chuck

I am dying to tell someone ... the last three OZ PDRacer foilplots that have been ordered have come from three guys in the USA.

One works for Westinghouse
One for Boeing
One for Grumman/Northprop

Classy company for the humble PDR!!!
Michael Storer

Texas Taxes
Hello, My name is Rich.

I have recently learned that in Texas, a person who builds a boat, has to get it registered and has to have it inspected. Now to prove that this D4 Dinghy is not something I stole from West Marine or whatever it is they think I may be up to. I have to show up at the TPWD office with a fistful of receipts, to prove that I did indeed build it. Receipts that I do not have, because the boat would only (This is what I told my wife) cost $200.00 to build! So in opting to not keep any receipts she would have no way to prove that in fact it cost nearly $800.00 to build. Now however, I need receipts to get it in the water, or they may catch me in an unauthorized, non-registered, un-inspected boat, surround me with gunship’s, Taser me into submission which has a high probability of electrocuting and stunning fish, which would also make me a felonious animal rights violator, Also in my stunned and Taser induced throes of agony I may fall overboard, which would likely be construed as an attempted suicide, the kindly gentle officer of the peace, (The one pulling the trigger on the Taser, may have the gun jerked out of his hand when I fall overboard, lose his balance and fall overboard as well! This would bring the charges of resisting arrest, attempted manslaughter of a federal law officer, and disarming a police officer to the list of charges. Now my attorney seems to think that he could get me a plea bargain to avoid the death penalty and just do a life term but….

Sorry for the long winded tall tale, I just find it pretty funny that they are so adamant about the proof of purchase, I mean I could understand it for a 39 foot Ketch, but I told her it is less than 8 feet long and fits in my pick-up. Well! she says, you better have receipts for most of it! We want to make sure you paid Taxes!

Best Regards

Rich F.

Small Craft Advisor needs info

Chuck:

Please let your readers know that we're still looking for more launchings for our Down the Ways column. If you get any reports on recently launched small boats and think the owner might be interested let us (or them) know. We only require 100-200 words and a couple of photos. I thought we'd be swimming in these articles, but they've been slow to come.

Best,
Josh Colvin - editor
Small Craft Advisor

Help for Bad Seals
Perhaps some do it yourself owners don't know about this , but should. The shaft seal in the lower unit gear box eventually wears and sometimes wear is on the contacting surface of the shaft. Also damage occurs from fishing lines, etc. You need not fret too much as it can be fixed most of the time. Seal manufacturer's make a product for this problem, it is called a "redi-sleeve". It is a very thin sleeve that you place over the worn / damaged shaft surface where your new seal will contact.

It is simple to install, comes with a "tool" for installing it, plus directions. Of course the pro's know about this, but I bet most do-it-yourself guy's don't. I have used them for several decades, THEY WORK. You WILL need the shaft seal journal diameter dimension when selecting the sleeve!

C. Butler

Googling Earth
Hi Chuck

Just enjoyed the "North Carolina Circumnavigation" via google earth. Liked the track. Excellent.

What a great gift that piece of software was to the world. Thanks Google!

That website of yours has really turned into a great source of all things nautical. Especially for the smaller boat owner.
Well done to you also.

David Perillo
http://www.openboat.co.nz/

Chuck,

That’s fantastic! Great idea. I hope you’ll be able to do that with other cruise stories.

This is a real treat to look at. I’ll forward to Bruce as he’ll enjoy it too. Following journeys on maps has always been fun for me. I look forward to the ’08 Everglades Challenge as I think they’ll be tracking on a map somehow – will you be doing that??

Let me know if I can help with anything. Thanks

Steve

Spam Filters Eating Perfectly Good Email
Hi Chuck - just to let you know -

[dwforum] Digest Number 1770

was diverted to my Spam folder by Gmail - don't know what criteria it's using - Digests after that did not get diverted.

Maybe people need to prune their replies a bit - maybe Gmail is seeing too many external links or something.

Regards, Pat.

Anyone who gets email needs to be aware of this problem. Huge quantities of spam require spam filters and they are getting pretty aggressive. Check your filters weekly. We recommend a whitelist service like Spamarrest - Chuck
Plagiarism is not Right
RE: "The Franciscan Monk's Knot"
by Bryant Owen

I am somewhat dismayed that you would post somebody else's article and artwork (mine) on your website, without asking the permission of the author.

I realize that the writer of the article on your site has credited my website "seascouts.ca" for the description of the Franciscan knot. However, that's not good enough. He modified my pictures and says nothing
about them on the page. (see http://www.seascouts.ca/resource/index.htm
and follow the menu to heaving line knot)

As far as I know, nobody has ever asked me for permission to use my work. All this guy had done was to slap a lot of inconsequential babble about his daughter's mascarade wedding around _my_work_ and posted it as his own.

I have created those images especially in order to avoid using other people's illustrations on my website, even though there is an implied licence in Scouting literature to copy the work as long as it is used for Scouting purposes.

I am sure you would not appreciate my pilfering your website for content and then just leave a note somewhere out of the way of where I swiped it from. (in fact we are delighted to have links to Duckworks where ever they may be as search engine spiders pick them up and that enhances our standing with them - Chuck)

As an editor, you have a duty to make sure that whatever is posted on your website is either an original work or has secured the written permission of the author.

Also, in the comments about the knot itself. Most of the comments are if not outright nonsense, they are at least ill informed.

RE Hangman's noose.
If the commentator had ever tried to even tie a hangman's noose, he would know that with 13 turns it becomes pretty much unusable. It is usually tied with 7 to 9 turns and even then it is difficult to work. The function of the hangman's noose is to break the "user's" neck, not to choke him. As for the knot's legality or otherwise, that is downright childish silliness. It does not even rate as an urban legend.

RE blood knot.
It looks very similar to the heaving line knot only to somebody who does not know much about knots. Its turns run from the working end towards the bitter end, while in the Monk's knot you form a bight on the working end and then work your turns from the standing part back towards the working end, and finally tuck it through the loop formed there.

For reference please see The Ashley Book Of Knots (ABOK) which usually serves as the standard reference work for knot tyers.

Heaving line knot ABOK #535
Hangman's knot ABOK #366 and
for what some have described as "blood knot" in use on their fishing hooks, please see ABOK #323

Ashley claims never to have seen an actual blood knot. Unfortunately, he considers it to be a knot tied on a cat o' nine. It is entirely possible that it was tied on the tails in order to draw blood. There are other references to a "blood knot" in other literature. The problem with knots is that some knots are known by two or more different names (reef/square, Monk/Franciscan/Heaving line) and in some instances one name is used to describe several different knots (love or lovers' knot, friendship knot, etc.). This the principal reason for using Clifford Ashley's book as a standard reference point.

A Blood Knot is described by Owen, Blandford, Graumont and several other respected authors. There are several variations on the same theme which is essentially an overhand knot extended by more than 3 turns. All are similar to ABOK #323. In any case this Blood knot is used as a bend (joining two lines together) or a hitch (fastening a line to another object such as a pole, hook, ring, etc.). The Monk knot is a stopper, it is used at the end of a line.

Finally, I would consider the heaving line knot impractical for the average small craft operator since it is intended to carry a heaving line ashore.
The heaving line is attached to a hawser (usually by a sheet bend) which ties the ship to the pier. I suspect that not many small craft carry a 2 or 3 inch hawser as their docking line. A small craft operator would be far better advised to use one of the (relatively) inexpensive throw bags as they are more compact, light weight and more easily stowed. They or a similar floating line of 15m are required by Cdn Coast Guard as safety equipment. They are readily available at stores like Canadian Tire, Walmart or West Marine. I believe there are also instructions available on line on how to make your own throw bag.

I grant you permission to keep the descriptions and photos on the pages, as long as both carry proper credits right next to them, not burried someplace at the bottom of the page.

the credit should read
"photo and text © Karl Pollak - www.seascouts.ca - used by permission"

Regards,

---
Scouting is a game. Go play outside!
Karl Pollak, SuperNatural British Columbia

October
A Fan
I just wanted to tell you that I really like the tone and spirit of your site, and of Duckworks.

I'm moving aboard my boat for the winter (I need a new adventure) and I appreciate your minimalist approach.

FD Corey
Gluing Idea
For awhile now I have been trying something and I really like it.... I find that gluing things has a way of spreading to other parts of wood that you really didn't want to get glue on.. Then you have the time in sanding, crapping and your energy, not to mention the wood you have to take off getting it right again.....

For instance,,, gluing decks to gunwhales and so on... I know you are familar with painters tape (#2080 Blue is the best) I put this on before I start gluing... Real close to the seam where the two parts come together and walk it down and under .. In this case,, I start at the bottom and work to the seam.... then I use wax paper, little slats of wood,, glue and clamp it all down ..

After it sets ,,, I peel everything off and have very little clean up to do... My wood is clean and all I have to do is a little final sanding ... I off to the next thing...

Thought I wood share that with you.. I've been playing with this for a little while now an I really like it....

I'm off to the lake to see a C+C ... I really have to play with those windows .... The glue, Primer and cleaner ran close to $100 bucks.. Dang!!!..

It's going to be a Sub-Zero here in a few months.. I need a Flordia job..... Ratty
Rowing Mirror

Wow I paid $20 plus shiping for these things and now I found a site with them for much less.

http://biketiresdirect.com/productdetail.asp?p=TLEGM

Frank L

Gumboots
I have just read Jeff Gilbert's article on the planing and pitfalls of building your own boat, Gumboots appears to be a product of plenty of thinking and long term planning in order to save expenditure. I have wanted a certain second hand boat for some years and have found that posting of a picture and drawings of it on the wall helped the process of acquiring it, to assist with the final parting of the money for the initial purchase was helped by previously putting a picture of the boat on the screen saver at work therefore helping me remember one of the reasons why we come to work each day. I enjoyed Jeff's writing style and the article very much and have sent it to a friend contemplating a similar exercise.

Yours thankfully
Chris Boyce
Bad Images
Hi Chuck

I just saw my article on Semi Automatic Leeboards, thanks for publshing it.

There seems to bee a problem with the illustrations though, the drawings of the boards seem to have been somehow corrupted and now obscure the detail.

Is there anyway to correct this.

Regards

John Tompkins

Those images indeed lost something in the translation - they have been updated, however, so you may want to review the article - Chuck

Pirogues
Hi Chuck

Another material you might find interesting is mahogany plywood sold in lumber stores as 1/8" door skins. These have a low weight/ stiffness ratio. They are nature's composite, with very little glue used by the manufacturers and hence the low weight. For the chines and gunwales I use 3/4" x 3/4" doug. fir (DF) cut from 2 x 4s on a table saw. Joints are made by wood glue and 3/4" nails (much nicer to handle than resins). Use copper ring nails if you can find them.

To make your pirogue, cut out the bottom from sheets of door skin.
For a 16" boat use an 8' center length and 4' lengths at each end.
Use inside scabbed joints. Bend to the required curvature which is easily done by hand, and clamp to maintain curvature. Glue and nail
(G&N) a DF strip on each edge. Instead of hammering nails, try driving them with a pair of hand pliers. Sand to give the edge the required angle for the sides. Only very gentle double-curvature is possible with a 1/8 ply sheet. Cut rectangular sheets for the sides and G&N to chines. The outside ply should be upright. Clamp in place and get the desired shape on one side and copy the shape on to the the other side. Use DF shaped posts for bow and stern joints (out of
1 x 1 or 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 sections). G&N 3/4 x 3/4 DF strips for gunwales. Use a saber saw and sandpaper to trim sides to chines and gunwales. Install seats using 1/8 ply reinforced by G&N DF strips if necessary. Use 3/4 DF strips G&N to side and bottom for joints of
seats. Plug any errant holes with chopped glass and resin.
Construction time very short: dictated by wood glue drying time.

To finish use "boat paint". To make boat paint I buy gallons of latex paint cheaply from OSH, a hardware store, where paint has been returned because of wrong color and re-sold very cheaply. I mix these together in a bucket and finish up with interesting colors, but does color really matter? I apply three or four coats, tipping the boat upside down and on its sides to ensure that the paint soaks down into the wood.

The result: a cheap, very easy-to-build, lightweight piroque/kayak/ canoe. Use of a manufactured laminate saves the lay-up process.

Plans? Shape the bottom to the desired size. Decide on the
freeboard needed (remember Archimedes) and start cutting wood.
Remember, the two sides should be the same shape.

If you build, please let me know what you think.

Peter O'Driscoll

Duckworks Newsletter markes as "Spam"
Hi Chuck - just to let you know - my email service (Gmail) has interpreted your newsletter as Spam - I don't know what the criteria were but I guess similar emails you send to other Gmail users could well end up in their Spam folder. I just happened to browse the spam folder today and saw it.

I have marked your email as "not spam" so in future (I hope!) it won't intercept anything from you.

Regards, Pat O'Leary

Fitting footbraces

I ordered two sets of footbraces for my kayaks, but after trying to fit them, I found the holes didn't match up. Mine are just over 14-1/2 inches apart on both boats (different manufacturers). I hated to give up on the braces because they looked like they would be wonderful on my feet and to adjust. I was afraid I was going to have to return them, but I ended up using a dremel and enlarged both brace holes toward the ends, and they fit perfectly. Just thought I would let you know in case someone else has the same problem sometime.

Marylyn McLeod

September
Polepunt Plans

Hello Chuck-

One of my colleagues will have his 30th birthday on August the 23rd. He's interesting with boatbuilding, and looking at my set of plans and helping me with the rudder job a little (he's a cabinetmaker at my museum) found Polepunt as good for him. A group of friends decided to give him a set of boat plans as a birthday gift.

I've red polepunt article by Rob. Great. Looking forward for next parts. My sailing version will be ready for late autumn Vistula photo expeditions.

Best regards.

Wojtek

Arkansas Messabout

Folks,

It is almost upon us! The first weekend of Fall is the Arkansas Messabout -- September 22-23. Only a few weeks away. There should be a wide variety of home-built craft here.

I can almost promise the weather will be better than last year. Last year was the “Tale of Two Messabouts”. Friday evening was very windy--my wind speed indicator was showing 16-20 mph when I was out sailing in my June Bug. Saturday morning gave us a massive line of thunderstorms, straight line winds peaking over 60 mph and tornadoes in the county. Most folks went home mid-day Saturday with wet bedding, clothing and dampened spirits. Saturday afternoon however, showed those who slept in Saturday morning (sic!) some beautiful sailing in the afternoon. We grilled some chicken outdoors and then sailed again at sunset against a beautiful orange sunset winds at 6 to 9 mph. Sunday morning the wind was gentle 2-5 mph and mostly sunny. Taking the law of averages, this year will be better!

If you can only come one day, Saturday is the day. If you can, bring something for the potluck at the pavilion on Saturday late afternoon. I will be grilling some chicken.

Hope to see you,

Phil Lea

(There is more informaton about this messabout on our Calendar)

New Book

Dear Chuck,

This is to let you know that I have finished my book and, in the absence of a crowd of publishers fighting over the manuscript (though there is a house in Bangkok that has shown a bit of interest), I’ve “published” it myself via a print-on-demand outfit, www.lulu.com. I set out to do a complete photo document of all the remaining wooden boat types in Viet Nam (which is essentially a coastal and riverine country, with an amazing variety of working boats). I think I got close, but didn’t quite make it. Nonetheless, in 223 pages and several hundred photos with text, it’s a very interesting record of the state of affairs at this point, with good documentation of boat yards, repair and construction on-going, many boats in harbor and a some (I wish there were more, but it’s hard to arrange) at sea or at work. I suspect you will enjoy the chapters on boatbuilding and boat yards in particular.

The one-at-a-time printing costs are huge, so a single copy of the book is $45, but it can be downloaded for $5 or I could get you a CD version if you’d prefer. I have a proof copy of the book and the production is very nice.

Obviously I’d be tickled if you read and enjoyed the thing and much more so if you reviewed it or linked to it on Duckworks. The URL to go straight to the book is:

www.lulu.com/content/811088

Speaking of Duckworks, I enjoy it thoroughly. Thank you very much.

Best Regards,

Ken Preston

PS - I’m going to be sitting in at a booth at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival in early September, with a few copies of the book and a stack of CD’s and business cards. After all the work it will be a thrill to actually get the book out in circulation. I spent 2 months twice (Jan and Feb 2005 and Sept and Oct 2006) riding all over the country on little motorbikes, hunting for boats and boat yards. 8000 miles of riding, a couple of thousand photos, one case of dysentery, two motorbike crashes (and innumerable repairs). . .the book about writing the book would probably make better reading.

The 16th Annual Lake Monroe Messabout

Get in one last fling before winter. The Lake Monroe Messabout brings together enthusiasts who love to build, use, and discuss small boats (sail, paddle, oar). Bring a boat, if you can. Otherwise, bring boat plans, pictures, tales, and your interest in small boats. Note: Armchair sailors are welcome. Those without boats are encouraged to attend. There are enough boats so that everyone can get on the water.

The Messabout will be held on the shores of Indiana’s beautiful Lake Monroe (10,000+ acres) at the Paynetown State Recreation Area, which has boat ramps, a beach, and a campground. The campground has sites for tents and RVs. No sites will be reserved; we will congregate in the tent area (sites 1-10, 28-32) near the store that you come to before you get to the campground control station. There is a home I.U. football game that weekend (start time not listed), so try to avoid SR 46 Bypass. Here are some motel suggestions: Best Western, 4501 E. 3rd St., 812-332-2141; Century Suites Hotel, 300 St. Rd. 446, 812-336-7777; Travel Lodge, 2615 E. 3rd St., 812-339-6191 (or consider staying in Indianapolis or Columbus).

There is no schedule for the weekend. Typically, people arrive on Friday afternoon and evening or Saturday morning. We will have a pitch-in supper Saturday night. If your last name begins with A-L, please contribute a salad, pasta, or hot dish; if M-Z, please contribute a vegetable, fruit, or dessert. Bring your own service, drink, and meat.

Bloomington is 50 miles south of Indianapolis on SR 37. If coming from Indy, take the SR 46 Bypass around the northeast side of Bloomington, then east on SR 46 (E. Third St.) to SR 446 south. Go south on 446 to Paynetown State Recreational Area.

Bob Bringle, 141 E. 44th St., Indianapolis, IN 46205 (W) 317-274-6753 (H) 317-283-8321 Email: rbringle@iupui.edu

Kingston Messabout

Just a last confirmation, The Kingston Ontario Messabout is a go for the weekend after Labour Day. Sept 6, 7 and 8, 2007.

My Welsford skiff "Twisted-Seagull" will be there of course. Along with the school built June Bug. John Bartlett will be there, I think with his Loon, and Paul McLellen's Bolger housebout. More also.

Location Rideau Acres Campground, Cunningham Rd, Kingston, Ontario, with campsites available. To reserve a site call their booking office at 613-546-2711.

Wine and cheese dockside Friday at 7 pm.
Messabouting in general all day Saturday.
Pot luck dinner in the clubhouse Saturday at 7 pm. (I'm making a big spicy Jambalaya)

Details are at my site:
http://www.brucesboats.com

My uploading program has crashed so I can't update names and pics of confirmed attendees, but it should be a blast as always.

Looking forward to old freinds and meeting new ones.

Bruce Hector
My cell will be on all weekend unless I drop it in the river again!
613-536-8507

Request to "borrow" articles

Dear Chuck,

We would like to “borrow”, translate and publish some of your articles in Croatian magazine specialized for small boat owners. Probably you are asking yourself who is this guy with funny request for taking our articles to be translated into Croatian and published in Croatian magazine for small boat owners.

Let me introduce project and myself to you in brief. Although I’m connected to sea and boats from birth real love happened in far 1989, on my first 7day sailing trip. So, 18 years later I’m even more in that love mood!

Credo of project is “life with the sea, from the sea, by the sea”. We are enthusiastic about idea, and there is lot of passion behind this project.

First we made feasibility study for segment and found free space for us. It’s modest, but gives hope for commercial business case. Small team of four people will lead network of authors and marketing. We are in phase of market testing. In parallel materials for first and second issues are gathered. Focus will be on local needs, but we would appreciate news, ideas and stories from all around the world. Community of small boat owners has similar attitude toward sea and boats on all continents. We have passion, idea and will to do it, now we are seeking for all possible content sources.

What to tell you about myself? Besides sailing I was in rowing for 10 years, where I had luck to be on four world championships, two times in finals (4th and 5th in the world). I hold bachelor in Electrical Engineering and master’s degree in Economics (Management & Organization). For nine years I was in retail industry on area of sales, marketing and strategy (from manager to director positions). Now I’ve focused on idea to make living out of a hobby. All the elements are here – knowledge, experience, passion, dedication, endurance so, what else to do than to go for it.

As time taught me on many projects I’ve participated or lead, experience and knowledge are important, but only passionate teams deliver extraordinary results. So here I’m standing in front of you with humble request for cooperation.

I’ll be happy to answer on questions you have, and I hope that our discussion will lead to cooperation. If you have some suggestion or advices for us feel free to share. We could follow up this mail in more details by conversation via Skype.

Best regards,

mr.sc. Martin Valek
partner, U pokretu d.o.o.

Matsushita Saw Blades

I see you now stock those great Matsushita blades. I have a 36 tooth one and just love it. Good move.

Steve

August
Moondance sails,mast, rudder, etc

Alas, my Thomsom Small Boats designed Moondance hull was destroyed in a freak storm on Casco Bay. The 90 sq.ft spritsail, mast, sprits, daggerboard, rudder and hardware are available for free to someone who will use them, located in Freepoort, Me. Ron at ronina@rcn.com

Michalak Designs Rule

Hi Chuck --

I'm so used to northeast coastlines, where nearly every bit of waterfront has been spoken for and closed off or ruined somehow -- either big expensive houses, or marinas, or condos, or industry, or hyper-regulated harbors. . . . It's sad. Then you see real wild coast, like the national seashore parts of Cape Cod, and you think -- wow, it ALL used to be like this . . . . Anyway, I would love to get Sea Fever down to Texas someday. Not sure how we'd manage it, but it's now on my list of dream trips, along with the Bahamas.

It boggles my mind that more people aren't enjoying Frolic2, or Caprice, or Cormorant. Even among shallow-draft boats they seem to get short shrift: I was just looking through a recent WoodenBoat and saw Ted Brewer's "Mystic" reviewed. Nearly everything about it is inferior to Cormorant -- less headroom, more complex rig (though it sure is pretty), lead ballast and tall fixed masts so it can't be trailered, much less sleeping room and the two berths separated by the CB trunk so you can't even sleep next to your spouse, difficult rudder system, and on and on. I wanted to write to Mike O'Brien and say, "Do a comparison of these two!"

Well, we must just keep sailing and telling people about it and try to make a few converts.

All best,
Garth

Sampan info for Terry Niedermeyer (August Reports)

Hi Chuck

Craig O’Donnald’s cheap pages have plans for a model sampan which I have built at variouse scales and with various techniques, (sheet and planked) both work fine. All he needs to do is scale it up. If used with a Chinese lug sail (ar any other for that matter) then it needs ballast unless made of a dense wood.

Regards

Michael Birch

Comment on XCR (August Reports)

WOW!!!! The XCR tri looks fantastic.

Lee

Martin
Source of Hardware

Your selection is getting better everyday.

While you are most likely aware -- but many of your readers may not -- McMasterCarr is an excellant source of stuff. They now (last several years) take credit cards, have an online catalog and ship very fast. I live over 350 miles from one of their shipping points, I can order something after 3pm and it will usually be at my house the next day for UPS ground rates. The USPS can not even do over night mail (for $19.00) on a regular basis. MCMASTERCARR.COM

Thought you might want to pass it on.

Thanks

Larry

Mo No More

Mo the Dogadore is now Mo the doganomore! Developed a tumor and had to be put down.
Senor Marco

Hvalsoe-boats.com

Hi,

My name is Tim Yeadon. I'm a writer here in Seattle who recently helped Eric Hvalsoe (the master boatwright from Seattle) finish a website for his boat shop. I'd like to nominate it for inclusion on your links list.

Eric was busy with the CWB festival this week, so I told him that I'd send his new site's address out to a couple places where I thought it might belong.

Eric's new site is www.hvalsoe-boats.com.

Thank you,
Tim Yeadon

Lynda Mary for Sale

Well the Lynda Mary is up for sale. Montgomery 15. see details at http://www.tcboats.com/sales/sale1.htm

Firm Price.

Bill Tosh

Max Looks Angry?

So, as angry as Max looks, I'm not crazy to think I can restore a 1955 Evinrude 25HP?

Just bought it for $100, has serious compression, the darn cotter pin on the prop is so rusted it must have been there forever. And the prop is still fairly pretty white.

Bill Reardon

Stainless Screws Info

You might be interested to hear that the Gougeon Bros. have long recommended the "sheet metal screws" over regular wood screws when setting them in epoxy. Up here in Atlantic Canada the local marine supply houses only stock that type of screw. I am rapidly converting everything to stainless here in the salt water area. In one season the galvanized stuff is seriously rusted. Perhaps galvanized anchor chain is different--thicker coating--but bolts and screws are worthless.
Tom Schultz

Chebacco News

There is a new issue of Chebacco online at http://www.chebacco.com
Richard Spelling

Sucia Report

Chuck, you can see my report on the Sucia Island Messabout at:
http://andrewlinn.com/070713_sucia/sucia1_start.htm
It was the best time I have had on the water so far - this 'sitting on a lake and waiting for the wind to blow' is for pussies. Gimme a 12 knotter any day of the week.
Andrew Linn

Brain Fluttering

Is there a simple answer to a question I've had flutter around my brain from time to time? There is a seeming discrepancy between the capacity ratings of commercially made canoes versus pirogues and jon boats of similar size. For example, a canoe like the Old Town Osprey at only 14ft. has a stated capacity of a whopping 989 lbs. Similar craft of even longer length and similar beam in plywood are FAR less rated capacity like 250 - 400lbs or less. Even the JEM Pirogue 500, which I got the plans for is only rated at 555lb. The "500" is 15ft 6in. - a full 1 1/2 ft. longer and even wider than the Osprey or other canoes. It doesn't seem to make sense to me. I must be missing something. Can you straighten me out? Maybe I have a screw or two loose that needs some tightening.
Jim Hauer

Rudder Article

Hi Chuck

I have just time for a bit of small talk. Thanks for placing the article how to built rudders or dagger boards. When I read it over I have to tell you it is almost easier to build rudders in this way than it is to read the article. Never mind, I hope it helps some of your readers to build these appendages we need on most of our boats.

Today I got a letter in my forum which really made my day.

The exploding rudders are interesting. They are too old. When you sail so fast as this boat is doing you have boiling water on the leading edge of the rudders. The erosion is there very high. Again a good rudder section helps and otherwise only to re-epoxy regularly.

Have a nice day

Cheers, Bernd

July

Hey, Chuck!

How about an article on how Curtis converted that Volkswagen diesel.

Thanks.

Vince Ferrarese
Rockford, Michigan

Melonseed Turned Over

First big milestone reached. Rolled the hull with help from the family. My first hull rolling. Lots of prep and sweat and reward. And the curves! Curves everywhere! Planks swooping up the cypress stem and nestling together, resting for a moment before racing to the stern and slipping under the hollow. Popping back out to surprise you they meet evenly at the mahogany transom. Now I know for certain why boats are referred to in the feminine. I havent been this excited since I discovered girls.

Jim

Duckworks Reference in Wikipedia

Chuck, check it out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spritsail

Note the link to DW under External links.

Probably not news to you, but I thought it was cool.

--Rob Rhode-Szudy

(it was news to me, Rob. Thanks - Chuck)

Pretty Darn Happy

You know, I just love DW. I get up in the AM, look at Google News, then I look at http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/ to see what new outrages have been perpetrated on an unsuspecting populace, usually by southern attorneys general, then Slate, then DW New-- and even if the new thing is an article by someone I think is a complete crackpot about a topic that I think is complete lunacy, I like looking at the New column, and I might scan down and read something I overlooked, or reread something I read and liked, or maybe jump to the chandlery or something else, and in such a way fritter away anything from a few minutes to a big chunk of time, and it makes me pretty darn happy.

Mike

Bravo

I've been a fan for awhile now and wanted to tell you what an outstanding website this is. Keep up the fine work and thank you,

Dunewood Truglia, Esq.

Boat Sold

Chuck:
We are happy to let you know that we sold our 10' Seaclipper 10 Trimaran. Duckworks was our only source for advertising. Thank you for your great help, we very much appreciate Duckworks.
Bob & Virgene Trygg

Another Item Sold and Plans For Sale

Chuck,

My Classic Leg-O-mutton spritsail has been sold. Through you, I believe! Thanks.

I still have a bunch of boat plans I want to sell. Would you please run a general ad offering people to ask for the latest list? Something like:
Various boat plans for sale. For latest list send request to b9bpattson@aol.com

Keep up the great work!

Bob Patterson

(Consider it done, Bob - Chuck)

Paint

Hey Chuck,

I was thinking that there should be a place on the site where people could write about and read about paint. I know we have the forum, and paint comes up now and again, but maybe there could be a paint index, so people could write about paint they have used or paint they've had problems with or whatever, and more than that, what might be cool is to have a way for people to list a boat by paint with a date, and then revisit annually at least and comment on how well it's held up.

Yeah, it might be a pia to set up, but if you could make it so that there were fields for the builder to just fill in, then you shouldn't have to do much. And that way people could track how well paint holds up. Or how easy it is to apply or how much it costs (all of which are fields I didn't include above...)

I'm just thinking that painting (and sometimes repainting) a boat is a big part of the construction process and that it would be good to make it so that people don't have to reinvent the wheel every time.

Just an idea. Or an idea for an idea.

Cheers,
Mike

Response to Terence Paré

Greetings!

A question: I have to build new bulkheads for my O’Day 23-foot sailboat. The chain plates for the mast bolt onto the bulkheads, which also separted the forward cabin from the main. The boat came with teak-plywood bulkheads which disintegrated when the previous owner allowed the cabin to fill with about 2 feet of water during two years of dry-dock. I am thinking of making solid-oak bulkheads by using a plate joiner to attach several oak planks together. The bulkhead itself is subject mainly to vertical stress and so, and I feel rather better about having sold wood as opposed to plywood. Does this sound like a bad idea?

Thanks,

Terence Paré

I think you need plywood. Your assumption that it is only vertical stress might be true at rest, but almost certainly is not when sailing in waves. It was probably built with plywood for a reason. It might turn out OK, but it would be a bad thing to find out the hard way.
--Rob

Stevenson Plans

Hi-

Have you ever considered carrying Stevenson Projects plans? I like some of their plans, but they're the worst in the world to deal with. I've sent emails and left phone messages over the course of a couple weeks starting about 5 weeks ago and STILL have yet to hear anything. I think they'd be better off letting someone else manage their sales...

In any event, do you have in stock the plans for John Welsford's "Swiftsure"?

Mitch

Anchors

Here's a simple question:

Have you any good ideas for managing an anchor in a smallish sailboat such as the Mayfly 14?

We've been having fun tossing our anchor out with 100 foot of line out of a bucket, and having the line snarl and tangle immediately. This after we've painstakingly "flaked" the line into the bucket etc.

Interested to hear any ideas. Type of line to use, length of line, method of stowing, etc.

-Tom Burton
Proud Co-builder of the BFS Scrimp

Chebacco Newsletter

There is a new issue of Chebacco online at http://www.chebacco.com

Richard Spelling

 

SAILS

EPOXY

GEAR